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Grateful dead dating

Rock's longest, strangest trip, the Grateful Dead were the psychedelic era's most beloved musical ambassadors as well as its most enduring survivors, spreading their message of peace, love, and mind expansion across the globe throughout the better part of three decades.

By 1962, Garcia was playing banjo in a variety of local folk and bluegrass outfits, two years later forming Mother Mc Cree's Uptown Jug Champions with guitarist Bob Weir and keyboardist Ron "Pigpen" Mc Kernan; in 1965, the group was renamed the Warlocks, their lineup by then including Lesh on bass as well as Bill Kreutzmann on drums.

The Warlocks made their electric debut that July; Ken Kesey soon tapped them to become the house band at his notorious Acid Tests, a series of now-legendary public LSD parties and multimedia "happenings" mounted prior to the drug's criminalization.

That a new medium of distribution has arisen - digital audio files being traded over the Internet - does not change our policy in this regard.

Our stipulations regarding digital distribution are merely extensions of those long-standing principles and they are as follow: No commercial gain may be sought by websites offering digital files of our music, whether through advertising, exploiting databases compiled from their traffic, or any other means.

See the FAQ, and the collection's policy notes below for more information.

Limited Flag: Lim Special / Lim Project / Lim Shows / Lim SBDs / Lim Range.

We reserve the ability to withdraw our sanction of non-commercial digital music should circumstances arise that compromise our ability to protect and steward the integrity of our work.

In 2007, writer Robert Greenfield interviewed Berkeley-dropout-turned-acid-cooker Owsley Stanley III – whose pure, potent LSD was favored by Ken Kesey's Merry Pranksters and the Grateful Dead – for Rolling Stone. "And I knew that Owsley was a unique individual with a world view that no one else shared." His original assignment was a life-spanning feature, but his reporting – including interviews with the Dead's Bob Weir, Phil Lesh and more – eventually provided enough material for an entire book.

"In Jerry Garcia’s words, ' We'd met Owsley at the Acid Test and he got fixated on us,'" he writes.

"' We had enough acid to blow the world apart… That got good and weird.'"Owsley left behind an extensive Grateful Dead material – still used to this day – and died as a singular counterculture figure.

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